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ACCUBOOST™ RADIATION TREATMENT


AccuBoost System Components Dedicated Mammography Station

The treatment of breast cancer was revolutionized in the mid 1980s when lumpectomy and radiation was found to be equivalent to mastectomy. Breast conservation therapy (BCT) starts with the surgical removal of cancerous tissue in a procedure known as lumpectomy. Lumpectomy is followed by daily sessions of radiation therapy to the whole breast for six weeks. Whole breast irradiation (WBI) is widely accepted as the “gold standard” for breast radiotherapy based on over three decades of experience.

The breast conservation therapy protocol also requires additional localized radiation, known as the “boost” dose, aimed only at the tissue surrounding the tumor bed. The combination of targeted surgery and completion of radiation therapy has been effective in preventing cancer recurrence. Numerous studies show that women with early stage disease have a clear option to preserve the breast and fight off the cancer.

AccuBoost is a machine that delivers the boost with image guidance. The image guidance is with mammography, the same modality that diagnosed the breast cancer. Treatment is delivered by an applicator for brachytherapy incorporated into a mammography unit. Each day, images are taken to verify the area to be treated. Then the radiation is delivered.

Another advantage of AccuBoost is there is typically less dose to normal tissues compared to standard radiation boost techniques. We have seen less acute skin reaction (sunburn) and less longterm thickening of normal tissue in the breast.

 

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MAMMOSITE® TARGETED RADIATION THERAPY


Mammosite Targeted Radiation Therapy

Mammosite is a radiation treatment technique for select cases of women with early stage breast cancer. A balloon is inserted in the cavity where the cancer was removed. If the final pathology confirms the women to be a good candidate for treatment, a radioactive seed is inserted in a balloon in the lumpectomy site to deliver the radiation treatment. Thus, treatment is given from the inside out.

Mammosite treatment has two advantages over standard radiation. The first is that treatment is delivered over 5 days instead of 6 ½ weeks. Treatments are given twice a day, six hours apart. The second reason is that because only part of the breast is treated, the breast usually looks better after treatment. In other words, the cosmetic result is improved.

Mammosite was FDA approved in 2002. As it has not been available as long as standard radiation, there is less data on long term effects. It is approved for women over 60 years of age with very early disease. Your doctor can evaluate whether you are a candidate for Mammosite

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INTRABEAM INTRAOPERATIVE RADIATION TREATMENT


Intrabeam Intraoperative Radiation Treatment Machine

IntraBeam is an exciting new technology for radiation treatment of women with breast cancer. It is intraoperative radiation treatment given at the time of the initial surgery for removal of the cancer and sampling of the lymph node. This single treatment can replace the 6 ½ weeks for daily treatment needed for standard radiation.

IntraBeam has been proven equivalent to standard radiation treatment for select early stage breast cancer patients by a large International prospective randomized trial called the TARGIT Trial. The study's results from over 2000 patients were published in the "Lancet" medical journal in 2010. At four years, there were 6 recurrences in 1113 women with IntraBeam as compared to 5 recurrences in 1119 women in the standard radiation group. Thus, a single IntraBeam treatment is equivalent to 6 ½ weeks of standard radiation treatments in these early stage patients.

Complications were similar in number, but different in type for the two groups. Seroma formation (fluid in the lumpectomy cavity) was more common in the IntraBeam group whereas skin sunburn with blisters was more common with standard radiation.

IntraBeam is new and only available at select locations. There are five sites offering IntraBeam in the state of Florida. This is partially due to the need to have a cooperative and collaborative team of physicians who support the technique. The team includes the surgeon, radiation oncologist, pathologist, radiologist, radiation physicist and administrator. We feel fortunate to be able to offer this treatment at our Baptist facility in Jacksonville, FL.

Currently, patients who are eligible for IntraBeam are women over 60 years old who have invasive ductal breast cancer with no adverse pathologic features and no lymph node involvement.

IntraBeam is an exciting new technology for radiation treatment of women with breast cancer. It is intraoperative radiation treatment given at the time of the initial surgery for removal of the cancer and sampling of the lymph node. This single treatment can replace the 6 ½ weeks for daily treatment needed for standard radiation.

IntraBeam has been proven equivalent to standard radiation treatment for select early stage breast cancer patients by a large International prospective randomized trial called the TARGIT Trial. The study's results from over 2000 patients were published in the "Lancet" medical journal in 2010. At four years, there were 6 recurrences in 1113 women with IntraBeam as compared to 5 recurrences in 1119 women in the standard radiation group. Thus, a single IntraBeam treatment is equivalent to 6 ½ weeks of standard radiation treatments in these early stage patients.

Complications were similar in number, but different in type for the two groups. Seroma formation (fluid in the lumpectomy cavity) was more common in the IntraBeam group whereas skin sunburn with blisters was more common with standard radiation.

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